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Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Said" Quotes from Famous Books



... said he, hastily advancing and putting a slip of paper into my hand. And, without another word or look, left the room, closing ...
— The Leavenworth Case • Anna Katharine Green

... tastes thoroughly harmonized. We were both of us, if not alike favoured, at least equally devoted, lovers of the wild and beautiful in nature; and many a moonlight walk did we take together this winter among the woods and rocks of the hill. It was once said of Thomson, by one who was himself not at all morbidly poetic in his feelings, that "he could not have viewed two candles burning but with a poetical eye." It might at least be said of my friend, that he never saw a piece of fine or striking ...
— My Schools and Schoolmasters - or The Story of my Education. • Hugh Miller

... prided himself on his powers of conversation, one day tried to "draw out" a fellow-passenger who sat beside him on the outside of a coach, but with indifferent success. At length the conversationalist descended to expostulation. "I have talked to you, my friend," said he, "on all the ordinary subjects—literature, farming, merchandise, gaming, game-laws, horse-races, suits at law, politics, and swindling, and blasphemy, and philosophy: is there any one subject that you will favour me by opening upon?" The wight writhed his countenance into a grin: ...
— Character • Samuel Smiles

... agree as to the grave consequences which must follow if it be continued, what on earth can we do? Of course the welfare of the rural population is a matter of paramount importance to the city and to the nation at large; but may we remind you that you said the evil and the consequences can be removed and averted only by those immediately concerned—the actual farmers—and that the remedy for the rural backwardness was to be sought for in the rural mind? 'Canst thou minister to a ...
— The Rural Life Problem of the United States - Notes of an Irish Observer • Horace Curzon Plunkett

... implied by patient repetition or perseverance, and what an incredible and varied power that man acquires who masters it. He who can lead himself, or others, into a habit can do anything. Even Religion is, in fact, nothing else. "Religion," said the reviewer of "The Evolution of the Idea of God," by GRANT ALLEN, "he defines as Custom or Practice—not theory, not theology, not ethics, not spiritual aspirations, but a certain set of more or less similar observances: propitiation, ...
— The Mystic Will • Charles Godfrey Leland

... forced me to learn these paraphrases, and chapters, (the eighth of 1st Kings being one—try it, good reader, in a leisure hour!) allowing not so much as a syllable to be missed or misplaced; while every sentence was required to be said over and over again till she was satisfied with the accent of it. I recollect a struggle between us of about three weeks, concerning the accent of ...
— English Prose - A Series of Related Essays for the Discussion and Practice • Frederick William Roe (edit. and select.)

... consult our own comfort, brother John and I would do so without hesitation. Bishop Hedding hopes to visit us at our approaching Conference. Rev. R. Newton, of England, will not visit Canada. Mr. —— has told him that it was not worth while to go to Canada; and all that can be said to induce him to come is unavailing. We in Canada are not worth so ...
— The Story of My Life - Being Reminiscences of Sixty Years' Public Service in Canada • Egerton Ryerson

... of Amyot, (1558,) not for its merits, but from the author's having been rewarded by Henry II. of France with the nomination to an abbey—as if in tardy compensation to Heliodorus, in the person of his literary representative, for the see from which the authorship is said to have ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine—Vol. 54, No. 333, July 1843 • Various

... and the "peuple francais," you are allowed thirty kilometres an hour in the open country, and twenty in the towns. You can do anything you like beyond this—at your own risk, and so long as no accident happens nothing will be said, but you must pull up when you come to a small town where M. le Maire, in the name of his forty-four electors, has decreed that his village is dangerously laid out for fast traffic,—and truth to tell it often is,—and accordingly you are limited ...
— The Automobilist Abroad • M. F. (Milburg Francisco) Mansfield

... spell of the place. Pausing under those trees, and feasting one's eyes upon the lovely, rural scene, not a sound reaches the ear except the twitter of the birds, and perhaps the faint jingle of a cow-bell. Mrs. Pitt gave a start at the sound of John's voice, when he suddenly said: ...
— John and Betty's History Visit • Margaret Williamson

... everything she has ever heard of. It is a bad case when mole traps will not catch, or corn soaked in Fowler's solution of arsenic and dropped along their runways will not finish them. In this case I can only refer her to other said-to-be cures that other people have tried and have faith in. A dozen witnesses testify that the seeds of Ricinus (Castor Bean,) dropped here and there in their tunnels will make them leave. A Connecticut lady says a sure remedy is to drop handfuls of salt here and ...
— The Mayflower, January, 1905 • Various

... thorough-paced villany [sic] of a backbiting Scotchman should be ridiculed? What a wretched state the Comic Muse and the Stage would be reduced to, were the prohibition of laughing at the corruption and other vices of the age to prevail!"[3] True the Comic Muse, long sick, as Garrick said in his prologue to She Stoops to Conquer, had almost died, though farces had done something to sustain her. Fielding's and Garrick's little satires had largely avoided sentiment; and the personal, often gross farces of Foote had continued to use ridicule. But even these ...
— The Man Of The World (1792) • Charles Macklin

... to clear up this fraud to my man Friday; and told him, that the pretence of their old men going up to the mountains to say O to their god Benamuckee was a cheat; and their bringing word from thence what he said was much more so; that if they met with any answer, or spake with any one there, it must be with an evil spirit: and then I entered into a long discourse with him about the devil, the original of him, his rebellion against ...
— The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe Of York, Mariner, Vol. 1 • Daniel Defoe

... fellows, I want to say that this incident is closed," said he firmly. "You are beaten every way from the jack, as you would say. You put up this race to skin innocent parties, and you thought to use my friends for your purposes, and have failed. The face was fairly won by our horse, and that goes. If any man ...
— Ted Strong's Motor Car • Edward C. Taylor

... for cooking supper was blazing briskly, Joe returned from a foraging expedition quite out of breath, and with his milk-pail half empty. He said that he had met three tramps on the road, which passed through the grove not very far from the camp, and that they had snatched a pie from him that he had bought at a farm-house, and had chased ...
— Harper's Young People, August 10, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... that state of mind, more or less,' said Morton, in his dreamy voice—a voice good for the nerves. 'It comes generally when one's stomach is out of order. You wake at half-past two in the morning, and suffer infernally from the blackest ...
— The Whirlpool • George Gissing

... then, for he the time doth seize, "Call ye to council even now, and sit and praise the peace, 460 And let the armed foe wrack the realm!" Nor more he said withal, But turned about and went his ways from that high-builded hall. Said he: "Volusus, lead away the Volscian ranks to fight, And Rutuli! Messapus, thou, afield with horse and knight! Thou, Coras, with thy brother ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... of all sorts of matters, without for a moment feeling any desire to allude to the tenderness which filled their hearts. What was the good of referring to that? Did they not well know what might have been said? They had no confession to make. Theirs was the joy of being together, of talking of many things, of surrendering themselves to the pleasure of their isolation without a shadow of regret, in the very spot where every evening he embraced his wife ...
— A Love Episode • Emile Zola

... the training-system in the gymnasia usually occurs before the nineteenth or twentieth year. With the reception of the certificate of maturity the youth may be said to have donned the virile toga. He enjoys during his university years a degree of liberty such as he never enjoyed before, never will enjoy again when his student-days are over. Having taken out his matriculation-papers, and given the Handschlag ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 7, Issue 41, March, 1861 • Various

... upon your secrets, Mr. Haw," said Robert, "but of course I cannot deny that I should be very proud and pleased if you cared ...
— The Doings Of Raffles Haw • Arthur Conan Doyle

... you looking at me thus?" he said at last in anger. "Will you take it or not? or shall I take it elsewhere? I have no time to waste." He did not intend to say this, but the words came out. The tone seemed to quiet ...
— The Continental Classics, Volume XVIII., Mystery Tales • Various

... saints of your Saints' Rest defend us from lying among any worse!" said he, and betook him ...
— Red Axe • Samuel Rutherford Crockett

... The little boys said there were plenty of saucers; and Mr. Peterkin agreed with Elizabeth Eliza that all would not come. Old ...
— The Peterkin Papers • Lucretia P Hale

... with her the daughter of a judge, eminent, it was said, both for legal and literary ability, and I heard from many quarters, after I had left New Orleans, that the society of this lady was highly valued by all persons of talent. Yet were I, traveller-like, to stop here, ...
— Domestic Manners of the Americans • Fanny Trollope

... finally requested the Breton knight to take with him two sails, one white and the other black, the first to be hoisted upon his return should Ysonde accompany him back to Brittany, the sable sail to be raised should his embassy fail of success. Now Ysonde of Brittany overheard all that was said, her jealous fears were confirmed, and she resolved to be ...
— Legends & Romances of Brittany • Lewis Spence

... Gres had a section of his twenty-pound Parrott guns unlimbered, firing into the town. I asked him what he was firing for; he said he could see some rebel cavalry occasionally at the intersections of the streets, and he had an idea that there was a large force of infantry concealed on the opposite bank, lying low, in case we should attempt to cross over directly into the town. I instructed him not to ...
— The Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman, Complete • William T. Sherman

... who had been high all these years in the King's favor, because of her kindness to the dead Queen Hermione, said—"I have a statue made in the likeness of the dead Queen, a piece many years in doing, and performed by the rare Italian master, Giulio Romano. I keep it in a private house apart, and there, ever since you lost your Queen, I have gone twice or thrice a day. Will it ...
— Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare • E. Nesbit

... Governor Clinton, of New York, from Washington's Headquarters, Valley Forge, March 12, 1778, said: "We have nothing new in camp save that Captain Barry has destroyed, with a few gunboats, two large ships belonging to the enemy, laden with forage from Rhode Island. He also took an armed schooner which he has since been obliged to run ashore after ...
— The Story of Commodore John Barry • Martin Griffin

... said Calhoun, "that you're a sybarite, Murgatroyd. This impassioned desire of yours ...
— The Hate Disease • William Fitzgerald Jenkins

... was ineffectual. The keen eyes of the detectives and the keener ear of scandal had the whole truth in a week's time. It was suicide, said ...
— David Lockwin—The People's Idol • John McGovern

... 'It all comes in the day's work,' as the man said when the lion ate him! You should have a letter, but I'm up to the eyes in parish maters. All I can say is pray for that charity which covers the multitude of sins, and then I think you'll find ...
— We Two • Edna Lyall

... said I; "and I think not. Your blood doesn't course strong yet, and you are fresh from the furnace. Besides, it is blowing a bitter cold gale. Look at that sky and listen to ...
— The Frozen Pirate • W. Clark Russell

... been under the sod now," said he, "if I had not told a lie then. Is it better to die than to ...
— The Young Fur Traders • R.M. Ballantyne

... some time to treat both of these gentlemen with every mark of distinction, and even cordiality: made them the companions of his table and excursions; and conversed with apparent openness and candour on the past, the present, and the future. "There is but one people in the world," said he to Colonel Campbell—"the English—the rest are only so many populaces. I tried to raise the French to your level of sentiment, and failing to do so, fell of course. I am now politically dead to Europe. Let me do what I can for Elba.... It must be confessed," ...
— The History of Napoleon Buonaparte • John Gibson Lockhart

... commonly said, that it requires more wit to perform the part of the fool in a farce than that of the master. Without intending any offence to the fool by the comparison, we may remark, that qualities of an elevated character are required for the support of the role of a man of fashion ...
— The Laws of Etiquette • A Gentleman

... gateway, Endora, the witch, stood by and gazed at the girl and Chios. The maiden pitied her, and gave her a coin of gold. The old woman looked up, first at Chios; then, turning to Nika, said: ...
— Saronia - A Romance of Ancient Ephesus • Richard Short

... "'Come Harriet,' said I, as I found her tending one baby and watching two others just able to walk, 'where is that piece for the "Souvenir" which I promised the editor I would get from you and send on next week? You have only this one day left to finish it, and have ...
— The Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe • Charles Edward Stowe

... occurring in their own number; and that they be and are also further authorized to transfer the investment of any funds that may be received by them for the endowment of Oahu College, to the Sandwich Islands, whenever they and the Trustees of the said College concur in the opinion, that this can be safely and ...
— The Oahu College at the Sandwich Islands • Trustees of the Punahou School and Oahu College

... without my stays and cravats. I must first get together the nine-hundred-and-ninety-nine chestsful of insufferable rubbish, that I have spent the last thirty years collecting—and may very well spend the next thirty hours a-packing of.' And what should we have said to that?" ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 20 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... drawings which indicate the same character of mind, though I think none so touching or so beautiful; yet they are not, as I said above, more numerous than those which express his sympathy with sublimer or more active scenes; but they are almost always marked by a tenderness of execution, and have a look of being beloved in every part of them, which shows them ...
— The Crown of Wild Olive • John Ruskin

... (or polypes and corals), with the double inconvenience, as it appears to me, of separating the sponges from their immediate kindred, the Protoplasta, and destroying the definition of the Coelenterata. So again, the Infusoria possess all the characters of animality, but it can hardly be said that they are as clearly allied to the worms as they are to ...
— Critiques and Addresses • Thomas Henry Huxley

... wanting?' cried he, as if making a new discovery. 'Couldn't ye ha' said soa, at onst? un' then, I mud ha' telled ye, baht all this wark, that that's just one ye cannut see—he allas keeps it locked, un' nob'dy iver mells ...
— Wuthering Heights • Emily Bronte

... emptiness of this passage. She could scarcely have said much less, if she wished to comfort him. And yet this passage is always quoted by those authors who accept love on the part of Lady Macbeth for her husband as the driving motive for her action. Indeed, Friedrich Theodor Vischer himself does not shrink from an interpolation ...
— Sleep Walking and Moon Walking - A Medico-Literary Study • Isidor Isaak Sadger

... detachment from modern conditions, and from modern frames of mind, is essential to an adequate appreciation of what has been said. Looking at these events through the distorting medium of an altogether different social atmosphere, one is apt to attribute them to the operation of lawless desire, and so have done with it. This, however, is to overlook the fact that we are dealing ...
— Religion & Sex - Studies in the Pathology of Religious Development • Chapman Cohen

... sort I even preached to him; taking care, however, not to be tedious, nor to let my expanded heart give him a contracted or impatient blow. And, indeed, he took visible pleasure in what I said, and even hung upon the subject, when I, to try him, once or twice, seemed ready to drop it: and proceeded to give me a most agreeable instance, that he could at times think both deeply and ...
— Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9) • Samuel Richardson

... laughter.) "When I asked one of my Officers the other day at a Meeting held after a tea, for which the people had paid a shilling each, to announce the collection, the woman-Captain, to my astonishment, simply said, 'Now, friends, go into the collection. Whack it into the baskets.' The whole audience was evidently fond of her, and ...
— The Authoritative Life of General William Booth • George Scott Railton

... arrange about the supplies and provisions, and we'll stock her up," said Tom to his companions. "Now you folks had better go ...
— Tom Swift in the Caves of Ice • Victor Appleton

... protect the colony against aggressive episcopacy and to maintain unimpaired the uniformity of purpose which had brought the settlers across the ocean. Under the circumstances there was something to be said in behalf of such a measure of self-protection, and the principle required but slight extension to cover such cases as the banishment of Roger Williams and the Antinomians. There was another side to the case, however. From the very outset this exclusive policy was in some ways a source of weakness ...
— The Beginnings of New England - Or the Puritan Theocracy in its Relations to Civil and Religious Liberty • John Fiske

... have much in common with the Dioscuri of Greece, and their mythical genealogy seems to indicate that their origin was astronomical. They were, perhaps, at first the morning star and evening star. They are said to be the children of the sun and the nymph Asvini, who is one of the lunar asterisms personified. In the popular mythology they are regarded as the ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... flattery, which in other countries is offered to the court alone; and if it were not for the occasional compunctions and doubts, which his real good sense will sometimes visit him with, the more enlightened American would be as happy in his own delusions, as the majority most certainly may be said to be. ...
— Diary in America, Series Two • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... "Oho!" said he, "wake up. Here be food, look ye, and, by Saint Crispin, rich and dainty. And drink—good wine, wake ...
— Beltane The Smith • Jeffery Farnol

... as has been said, was Lord Glenarvan's yacht, which had left Ayrton on the islet, and which was to return there some day to fetch him. Now, the islet was not so far-distant from Lincoln Island, but that a vessel, standing for the one, could pass in sight of the other. A hundred ...
— The Secret of the Island • W.H.G. Kingston (translation from Jules Verne)

... "Red," said she,—and it was not at all the sort of rejoinder he might have expected after his concession,—"why is there no woodpile now ...
— Mrs. Red Pepper • Grace S. Richmond

... said one day, coming out from behind his easel and studying her, through half-closed eyes, "I never really began to know you until now? Analyzing you—studying you in this fashion, not by your words, but by your expression, your pose, the very unconscious essence of your personality—these ...
— The Call of the Cumberlands • Charles Neville Buck

... situated, and, although not perhaps very suitable to a new country, it is a great ornament to the vicinity of Hamilton, embowered as it is in the natural forest. Near it, however, is a vast swamp, in which is Coot's Paradise, so named, it is said, from a gentleman, who was fond of duck-shooting, or perhaps from the coot or ...
— Canada and the Canadians, Vol. 2 • Richard Henry Bonnycastle

... to the rumours which reached him respecting Carnot and Berthier. He one day said to me: "What gross stupidity, is this? It is very well to say to a general, 'Depart for Italy, gain battles, and sign a peace at Vienna;' but the execution that is not so easy. I never attached any value to the plans which the Directory sent me. Too many circumstances occur on ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... breakfast, they said. It was rather a grim sort of a joke. Scarcely one in fifty had any thing to eat. A few had coffee, and fires were made, and we went through the regulation motions of getting breakfast. This done, we ...
— In The Ranks - From the Wilderness to Appomattox Court House • R. E. McBride

... as I have come across in years," he said. "Mrs. Pett, let me tell you something. It is one of my peculiarities that I never forget a face. You say that this young man pretends to have landed this morning from the Caronia? Well, I saw him myself more than a week ago ...
— Piccadilly Jim • Pelham Grenville Wodehouse

... minute since we had fallen asleep, when we were awakened by some one entering our room, and by a voice which said, 'I hef come tu pack yew.' It was the bath-man, William, to whose charge we had been given, and whom we soon came to like exceedingly; a most good-tempered, active, and attentive little German. We were very sleepy, ...
— The Recreations of A Country Parson • A. K. H. Boyd

... 'thy' sake I admit 171 That a Scot may have humour, I had almost said wit: This debt to thy mem'ry I cannot refuse, 'Thou best humour'd man with ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Oliver Goldsmith • Oliver Goldsmith

... reverence, with, which Spinoza was regarded by a few scholars during his life-time, it cannot be said that during the century following his death, in 1677, there was any wide acceptance of his ideas. The times were not favourable. For the political and social power of ecclesiasticism, whether established, or unestablished, compelled men of science and philosophers ...
— Pantheism, Its Story and Significance - Religions Ancient And Modern • J. Allanson Picton

... merman said was sensible enough, and Dalgard was willing to obey orders. As he left the storehouse, Sssuri trailed him, scuffing each dusty print the scout left. Perhaps a master of trailcraft could unravel that spoor, but the colonist was ready to believe ...
— Star Born • Andre Norton

... Lotys to that 'other side of Death' of which she had spoken,—that 'other side' which an inward instinct told him was not Death, but Life! He could not of himself analyse the emotions which moved him. He could not take the measure of his grief; it was too wide and too painful. He might have said with Heine: "Go, prepare me a bier of strong wood, longer than the bridge at Mayence, and bring twelve giants stronger than the vigorous St. Christopher of Cologne Cathedral on the Rhine;—they will carry the coffin and fling it in the sea,—so large a coffin needs a large grave! ...
— Temporal Power • Marie Corelli

... mint-master, also, was pleased with his new son-in-law; especially as he had courted Miss Betsey out of pure love, and had said nothing at all about her portion. So, when the marriage ceremony was over, Captain Hull whispered a word to two of his men-servants, who immediately went out, and soon returned, lugging in a large pair of scales. ...
— Sanders' Union Fourth Reader • Charles W. Sanders

... She often said, she would procure me some acquaintance that might be useful; she doubtless felt the necessity of parting with me, and had prudently resolved on it. Our mute declaration had been made on Thursday, the Sunday following she gave a dinner. A Jacobin of good ...
— The Confessions of J. J. Rousseau, Complete • Jean Jacques Rousseau

... silks and satins—and when he had first talked to her about his going away, she had asked him tremblingly to let her go with him and be married. It was his painful knowledge of this which had given the most exasperating sting to Adam's reproaches. He had said no word with the purpose of deceiving her—her vision was all spun by her own childish fancy—but he was obliged to confess to himself that it was spun half out of his own actions. And to increase the mischief, on this last evening he ...
— Adam Bede • George Eliot

... "Customer!" said Tom in a harsh voice. "Sorry to disturb you at your prayers, Guv'nor, but not having two pair of hands I can't serve a crowd," meaning the old woman of the undergarments ...
— The Virgin of the Sun • H. R. Haggard

... fifteen in the second, and fifteen in the third; it is evident they do not count Ernanton, and that he no longer forms part of the Forty-five," said St. Maline to himself ...
— The Forty-Five Guardsmen • Alexandre Dumas

... complain!" said the Grand Duke,—"though I swear to you I have always done the things I ought not to have done, and have left unread the papers I have signed. What more, in reason, can one ask of ...
— Gallantry - Dizain des Fetes Galantes • James Branch Cabell

... Major said he agreed with Mr. Hawkins that the inquirer seemed not altogether on the wrong track; but he also agreed that it would be best to keep quiet until more convincing developments ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... Tithraustes now begged Agesilaus to make peace and leave the country, and offered him money if he would do so. Agesilaus answered that he had no power to make peace or war, but that such propositions must be referred to the authorities at home; while as to money he said that he preferred enriching his soldiers to enriching himself, and that among the Greeks it was not considered honourable to receive bribes, but rather to take plunder from their enemies. Nevertheless, wishing ...
— Plutarch's Lives Volume III. • Plutarch

... whole centuries together. The wages of labour, therefore, are likely to be higher in manufactures of the former, than in those of the latter kind. Birmingham deals chiefly in manufactures of the former kind; Sheffield in those of the latter; and the wages of labour in those two different places are said to be suitable to this difference in the nature ...
— An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations • Adam Smith

... in explaining her projects to her father, and it so happened that she spoke at a moment of peculiar exhilaration on his part. "If it would give you pleasure," he said, "to learn these two accomplishments, you may do so, of course, but I foresee no probability of your ever putting them to use. I now have prospects," etc., etc. Soon after, he was in a deep sleep. She looked at him with troubled eyes, and promptly ...
— Without a Home • E. P. Roe

... gathering, the men begged him to remain on the larger ship, but Gilbert refused to leave the sailors of the Squirrel. The frigate was as safe for him as for them, he said. Some one called his attention to the fact that the frigate was overweighted with cannon. Gilbert laughed all danger to scorn. Soon afterwards the waves began to break short and high—a dangerous sea for a small, overweighted ...
— Canada: the Empire of the North - Being the Romantic Story of the New Dominion's Growth from Colony to Kingdom • Agnes C. Laut

... longer. He became a member of the Parliament, supported the popular opinions, and in a few years, by the influence of the popular party, was placed in the high and awful rank in which he now is. The fortunes of his country, we had almost said the fates of the world, were placed in his wardship—we sink in prostration before the inscrutable dispensations of Providence, when we reflect in whose wardship the fates ...
— The Life of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - 1838 • James Gillman

... Charley," said the Doctor, "that is the most remarkable paper I ever listened to. I do not quite know what to think of it. We shall have ...
— Talks on Manures • Joseph Harris

... explain it," Alexis said. "I was very intimate with both of them, and it is quite enough to have been intimate with two men engaged in a plot against the life of the Czar to ensure one a visit to Siberia. So that is it! I have thought of everything, and it seemed ...
— Condemned as a Nihilist - A Story of Escape from Siberia • George Alfred Henty

... discovered the means of destroying sound waves as well as shadows, and it was a much simpler feat," said Von Kettler with a sneer. "Tell them that when you get back to Washington, Yankee pig. Also you might be interested to know that most of your bombs fell on camouflaged structures that we had erected with ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, October, 1930 • Various

... said to be the pioneer among "food-reform" papers and I owe to it my own introduction to most of the more advanced ideas about food-reform. It never fails ...
— The Healthy Life Cook Book, 2d ed. • Florence Daniel

... people. They are furnished with modern agricultural text-books, and demonstration farms or experiment stations are maintained at convenient points. Thirty-seven practical stockmen have also been employed to give special attention to this part of the work, and the Indians are said to be cooperating intelligently in the effort to improve ...
— The Indian Today - The Past and Future of the First American • Charles A. Eastman

... to have thought and said then, all that I say and think at present. I was sorrowful and perplexed. The King's ministers were in a similar predicament. They believed that they neither could nor ought to recommend clemency. In this momentous contingency, power knew not how to be great, sometimes the only ...
— Memoirs To Illustrate The History Of My Time - Volume 1 • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... the almond does not offer a great deal for use in Michigan. It is sometimes said to be as hardy as the peach, but only as this refers to the tree and not to the fruit, is it true. Certain hardshell almonds edible, yet so inferior to the improved varieties as to have practically no market value, do sometimes succeed in lower Michigan ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Sixth Annual Meeting. Rochester, New York, September 1 and 2, 1915 • Various

... funny," she said, "though they wasn't intended to be; but what I've heard of yours ain't that kind. I wish you'd let me in on the joke. I haven't been feelin' like ...
— Keziah Coffin • Joseph C. Lincoln

... said, "it does, but don't worry why. Perhaps because, as the old man said to the vicar when he heard of Solomon's wives, you are a highly privileged Christian. You can't deny that, since you've said it twice. Praises be, here is tea. Come on; come on, Tommy. Oh, Tommy, this is the Very Reverend ...
— Simon Called Peter • Robert Keable

... he said, "I hear that you paid that Italian blackguard half-a-crown for his broken crockery yesterday, and since he made his claim upon me, though I owed him nothing, I don't choose to let it look as if you had paid anything for me, so here is ...
— Dr. Jolliffe's Boys • Lewis Hough

... matter for that,' said Robin; 'I love the girl, and I will never please my pocket in marrying, and not please my fancy.' 'And so, my dear,' adds he, 'there is no ...
— The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders &c. • Daniel Defoe

... my cousin Nicholas, who thinks no prospect complete unless that hill forms part of it," said Richard; "but since I find that you will often come hither at sunset, I shall not despair of seeing and conversing with you again, even if I am forbidden the house by Mistress Nutter. That thicket is an excellent hiding-place, and this stream ...
— The Lancashire Witches - A Romance of Pendle Forest • William Harrison Ainsworth

... prisoners," he said, after a moment's hesitation. "Take them to the lock-up, Olsen, and handcuff them securely," he ...
— Boyhood in Norway • Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

... credentials was appointed by the chair, consisting of one member from each organization.[501] During the absence of the committee quite an animated discussion arose as to the admission of delegates. Mrs. Gordon said the greatest possible liberality should be exercised in admitting persons to the right to speak and vote; that all who signed the roll, paid the fee, and expressed themselves in sympathy with the movement, should be admitted. After some discussion, ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III (of III) • Various

... reached Kohlgarten without being pursued, and were to bivouac around Rendnitz. Zebede was yet living, and, as we marched on, listening to the cannonade, which continued, despite the darkness, along the Elster, he said, suddenly: ...
— The Conscript - A Story of the French war of 1813 • Emile Erckmann

... now, Mr. Atterbury," he said, "with the things of Caesar, not of God. This church belongs to God—not to you. But you have consecrated it to him. His truth, as Christ taught it, must not be preached to suit any man's convenience. When you were young you were not taught the truth—neither ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... "Buck up, Polly," she said, "we ain't none of us finished yet. Look at us now—sittin' by our own fire with bread and puddin' inside us—an' think wot we was this mornin'. Who knows wot we'll ...
— The Dawn of a To-morrow • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... the jury, a plain, intelligent farmer, drew me aside and said, "That dog done the business! There was no gittin' around that! I've got a ...
— Idle Hour Stories • Eugenia Dunlap Potts

... Shock.—When a person suffers a serious injury, loses a large quantity of blood, or is subjected to a profound emotion, it affects the vital powers to such an extent that the individual is said to be suffering from shock. Shock expresses itself in varying degrees of apathy. The patient may or may not be conscious. If conscious he gives no evidence of feeling, he is silent and motionless although he will respond to directions ...
— The Eugenic Marriage, Volume IV. (of IV.) - A Personal Guide to the New Science of Better Living and Better Babies • Grant Hague

... Lord Chesterfield who said: "A man is received according to his appearance, and dismissed according to his merits." There is a bit of truth in this we would all admit, I have no doubt, if we studied the question. Clothes affect our own poise, ease, and attitude toward others and the expression of others toward us, but, ...
— What Dress Makes of Us • Dorothy Quigley

... des Palmiers. Alas, I can remember only one thing about those services. The clergyman had a peculiar impediment in his speech which made him say his h's and s's, both as sh. Thus he always said shuman for human, and invariably prayed that God might be pleased to "shave the Queen." He nearly got me into trouble once or ...
— A Labrador Doctor - The Autobiography of Wilfred Thomason Grenfell • Wilfred Thomason Grenfell

... we wonder, a single unfair weapon which the Germans have not used? It is now said that not infrequently a German band is made to play when the enemy's ...
— Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, October 7, 1914 • Various

... "Wonderful man, Beecher is," said a market dealer in green goods once. "I had handled thousands of bunches of celery in my life and never noticed how beautiful its top leaves were until he picked up a bunch once and told me all about it. Now I haven't the heart to cut the ...
— A Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward Bok

... needed it. Here is something that the French and American Governments might get together on, for surely the French want to conserve the energy of their women and children who now do this hard work, and the Americans want a wider market for their modern farm equipment. It must be said, however, that the women of the French peasantry who were doing this hard work, appeared strong and healthful, and were enured to this difficult labor, no doubt, through many generations of ...
— In the Flash Ranging Service - Observations of an American Soldier During His Service - With the A.E.F. in France • Edward Alva Trueblood

... told her of Hannah's death. "Impossible!" she exclaimed. "I left it last night in the old barn that was burned down. I merely meant to hide it for the present, and could think of no better place in my hurry; for the barn is said to be haunted—a man hung himself there once—and no one ever goes there. I—I—you cannot have ...
— The Leavenworth Case • Anna Katharine Green

... your pardon, sir,' he had said, in a confidential manner, on another occasion, taking me aside; 'but I have seen ...
— The Uncommercial Traveller • Charles Dickens

... your Majesty," said Captain Jemmy, thrusting himself forward, "but Roderick Salt's the damn'dest villain in your service; and that's saying a good deal. I mean no offence, ...
— The Blue Pavilions • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... Ponape (Pohnpei) Micronesia Ponta Delgada (US Consulate) Portugal Port-au-Prince (US Embassy) Haiti Port Louis (US Embassy) Mauritius Port Moresby (US Embassy) Papua New Guinea Porto Alegre (US Consulate) Brazil Port-of-Spain (US Embassy) Trinidad and Tobago Port Said (US Consular Agency) Egypt Portuguese Guinea Guinea-Bissau Portuguese Timor (East Timor) Indonesia Poznan (US Consulate) Poland Prague (US Embassy) Czechoslovakia Praia (US Embassy) Cape Verde Pretoria (US Embassy) South Africa Pribilof Islands United States Prince Edward Island ...
— The 1990 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... was to come to him some day in a brighter and more beautiful land that lay in the direction thought of rather indefinitely as the East. "If I do not move and keep moving I'll become like father, like all of the people about here," Hugh said to himself. He thought of the man who had bred him and whom he occasionally saw drifting aimlessly along Main Street or sleeping away a drunken stupor on the river bank. He was disgusted with him and had come to share the opinion the station master's wife had always ...
— Poor White • Sherwood Anderson

... we are," said Philip; "that's Mr Benson's farm, and we are six miles away from home. Never mind; let's go and tell Mrs Benson, I know she will let ...
— Hollowdell Grange - Holiday Hours in a Country Home • George Manville Fenn

... able thinker and writer a philosopher of the Swedenborgian school, too has said, "The conception of a mind absolutely sundered from all connection with space is a mere pretence which ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... boys driving some cattle, one of whom we caught and brought in. He was a plucky boy, and when threatened he just looked us sullenly in the face. He turned out to be a sort of grandson or grand-nephew of Lobengula himself. He said the King's camp was just ahead, and the King himself near, with very few men, and these sick, and that he wanted to give himself up. He represented that the King had been back to this place that very day to get help because his wagons were stuck in a bog. The ...
— The Red True Story Book • Various

... that by using a series of only five weights, and requiring them to be sorted into their proper order by the sense of touch alone, the chance of accidental success would be too small to be worth consideration. It might be said that there are 5 x 4 x 3 x 2, or 120 different ways in which five weights can be arranged, and as only one is right, it must be 120 to 1 against a lucky hit. But this is many fold too high an estimate, because the 119 possible mistakes are by no means equally probable. When a person is ...
— Inquiries into Human Faculty and Its Development • Francis Galton

... of Hsi Jen. Readily therefore he devised a plan to first get Hsi Jen out of the way, by despatching her to Pao-ch'ai's, to borrow a book. After Hsi Jen's departure, he forthwith called Ch'ing Wen. "Go," he said, "over to Miss Lin's and see what she's up to. Should she inquire about me, all you need tell her is that I'm ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book II • Cao Xueqin



Words linked to "Said" :   aforesaid, aforementioned, same, you said it



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