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Guerdon

noun
1.
A reward or payment.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Guerdon" Quotes from Famous Books



... have sung and served thee well, and praises won from thee, First as a lowly knave and then a warrior, bold and free, Today I claim my guerdon just, that all the host may know— To ride the foremost to the field, strike first against ...
— The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: - Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English, Volume 5. • Various

... lifted above all others was the reason he perceived the object, otherwise unperceivable; and this elevation of his eye was owing to the elevation of his spirits; and this again—for truth must out—to a dram of Peruvian pisco, in guerdon for some kindness done, secretly administered to him that morning by our mulatto steward. Now, certainly, pisco does a deal of mischief in the world; yet seeing that, in the present case, it was the means, though indirect, of ...
— The Piazza Tales • Herman Melville

... sculpture fair, Did long Lord Marmion's image bear, (Now vainly for its site you look; 'Twas levelled, when fanatic Brook The fair cathedral stormed and took; But, thanks to Heaven, and good Saint Chad, A guerdon meet the spoiler had!) There erst was martial Marmion found, His feet upon a couchant hound, His hands to heaven upraised; And all around, on scutcheon rich, And tablet carved, and fretted niche, His arms and feats were blazed. And yet, ...
— Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field • Walter Scott

... song dies: Come to the forest, Brother of the sighs. Heart-need is song-need, Brother, give me thine! Song-meed is heart-meed, Brother, take mine! I go the still way, Cover me with night; Thou goest the will way Into the light. Dust and the burden Thou shall outrun; Bear then my guerdon, Song, ...
— Path Flower and Other Verses • Olive T. Dargan

... seen, may give the world new points of view and make their loving, living, and doing precious to all human hearts. And to themselves in these the days that try their souls, the chance to soar in the dim blue air above the smoke is to their finer spirits boon and guerdon for what they lose on ...
— The Souls of Black Folk • W. E. B. Du Bois

... the guerdon and the mede Of alle louers pleinly in your honde Now of grace and pyte take ye hede Of my distrees, that am vnder your bonde So lowly bound, as ye wel vnderstonde In that place where I toke first my wounde Of pyte suffre ye ...
— The Temple of Glass • John Lydgate

... woe the day, That I such hated truth should say— The Douglas, like a stricken deer, Disowned by every noble peer, 230 Even the rude refuge we have here? Alas, this wild marauding Chief Alone might hazard our relief, And now thy maiden charms expand, Looks for his guerdon in thy hand; 235 Full soon may dispensation sought, To back his suit, from Rome he brought. Then, though an exile on the hill, Thy father, as the Douglas, still Be held in reverence and fear; 240 And though to Roderick thou'rt so dear, That thou might'st guide with silken ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... that God the Lord Will not let us perish, Since with scourge and rod and sword He our souls doth cherish; He amid this vale of woes Makes us bear the burden, That true joys in heaven's repose May be ours for guerdon. ...
— Wine, Women, and Song - Mediaeval Latin Students' songs; Now first translated into English verse • Various

... the promise of a reward in heaven. He gave up his all, even his Laura, to Virtue, though mockers called him a fool for believing in gods and immortality. At last he appears before the heavenly throne to claim his guerdon, but is told by an invisible genius that two flowers bloom for humanity,—Hope and Enjoyment. Who has the one must renounce the other. The high Faith that sustained him on earth was his sufficient reward and ...
— The Life and Works of Friedrich Schiller • Calvin Thomas

... said nothing more; but in his silence he read the history of the next four years in the light of Anne's remembered blush. Four years of earnest, happy work . . . and then the guerdon of a useful knowledge gained and ...
— Anne Of Avonlea • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... the name be a burden And the souls be no kindred of theirs, Should wise men rejoice in such guerdon Or brave men exult in such heirs? Or rather the father Frown, shamefaced, on the son, And no men but foemen, Deriding, cry ...
— A Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... and bring no satisfaction. The way seems lost to straight determined action. Like shooting stars that zig-zag from their course We wander from our orbit's pathway; spoil The role we're fitted for, to fail in twenty. Bring empty measures, that were shaped for plenty, At last as guerdon for a life of toil. There's lack of greatness in this generation Because no more man centres on one thought. We know this truth, and yet we heed it not: The secret ...
— Poems of Sentiment • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... had its match and equal in the "x-y" sign of restrictive deference. If one Messer arrived at some degree of prominence, then the best way for him to attain his end was to pit himself against another of his class nearest to him in influence. If he was not to gain the guerdon, then his ...
— The Tragedies of the Medici • Edgcumbe Staley

... Guerdon dear shall be his meed Who will be Love's thrall in deed: Strollings 'neath a mellow moon, Whispers soft as rain in June, Kisses, maybe, one or two— Maidens ...
— Cap and Gown - A Treasury of College Verse • Selected by Frederic Knowles

... mart let Justice still control, Weighing the guerdon to the toil!—What then? A god alone claims joy—all joy is his, Flushing with unsought light the cheeks of men. Where is no miracle, why there no bliss! Grow, change, and ripen all that mortal ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - April 1843 • Various

... done and the summit attained, And the barriers fall, Though a battle's to fight ere the guerdon be gained, The reward of it all. I was ever a fighter, so—one fight more, The best and the last! I would hate that death bandaged my eyes, and forbore, And bade me creep past. No! let me taste the whole of it, fare ...
— War Letters of a Public-School Boy • Henry Paul Mainwaring Jones

... Mrs. Charlton Denyse, and marched away, with the guerdon of Smith heaving above her outraged ...
— Little Miss Grouch - A Narrative Based on the Log of Alexander Forsyth Smith's - Maiden Transatlantic Voyage • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... stopped a passing stranger's steps, and thus his purpose told,— "See here the twin swords by my side, and see this purse of gold; Thy weapon choose to cope with One who should no longer live, And by an easy slaughter earn the guerdon ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, Number 361, November, 1845. • Various

... testimonials in your books I'll write. Thee, trusty guide, will I much eulogize As strong and cautious, diligent and wise, Active, unhesitating, cheerful, sure— Nay, almost equal to an Amateur! And thou, my meekest of meek beasts of burden, Thou too shalt have thine undisputed guerdon: I'll do for thee the very best I can, And sound thy praise as 'a good third-rate man.' But if ye fail, if cannonading stones, Or toppling ice-crag, pulverize your bones; O happy stroke, that makes immortal ...
— Sagittulae, Random Verses • E. W. Bowling

... happened that, notwithstanding the very considerable largesses which princes and peers bestowed on the minstrels, an impartial spirit of independence would seize the poet, and the harp was swept to the heroism of one who had neither palfreys nor garments to bestow in guerdon of his applause. ...
— The Talisman • Sir Walter Scott

... this Mr. Lovel resolutely declined. Their expense then was mutual, unless when Lovel occasionally slipt a shilling into the hand of a growling postilion; for Oldbuck, tenacious of ancient customs, never extended his guerdon beyond eighteen-pence a stage. In this manner they travelled, until they arrived at Fairport* about two o'clock on ...
— The Antiquary, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... than desire To close with her lord's pleasure; but Geraint Ate all the mowers' victuals unawares, And when he found all empty, was amazed; And, "Boy," said he, "I have eaten all, but take A horse and arms for guerdon; choose the best." He, reddening in extremity of delight, "My lord, you overpay me fifty-fold." "Ye will be all the wealthier," cried the Prince. "I take it as free gift, then," said the boy, "Not guerdon; for myself can easily, ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 5 • Charles Sylvester

... God called Azrael to Him now And bade Death bend the bow Against the saddest heart that beats Here on this earth below, Not any sobbing breast would gain The guerdon of ...
— Dreams and Dust • Don Marquis

... invitations, went to no rendezvous. Favours which other men would gladly have purchased with years of life, he disdainfully rejected. The wrinkled duennas, who under various pretexts brought him tender messages and tempting assignations, met, instead of the golden guerdon with which such Mercuries are usually rewarded, harsh rebuffs and cutting sarcasm at the hands of the stoic of two-and-twenty. And with so much scorn did this Manchegan Joseph repel on one occasion the amorous attentions of a lady of birth ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 379, May, 1847 • Various

... failure! A damsel did trust me with some such message to her cavalier and seeing that the love was all on one side—and that side her own—I dared not go back and face her—not even her guerdon could I by any means steal from him; brief:—I saved my neck by following you and leaving ...
— The Flute of the Gods • Marah Ellis Ryan

... she bowed and spake: "King, for thine old faith's plighted sake To me the lady of the lake, I come in trust of thee to take The guerdon of the gift I gave, Thy sword Excalibur." And he Made answer: "Be it whate'er it be, If mine to give, I give it thee, Nor need ...
— The Tale of Balen • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... future. Perchance a grave like those which he had left, perchance wealth, love, and honour. Whatever the event he would strive to meet it with patience, dignity, and resignation. It was not his part to ask questions or to reason why; it was his part to struggle on and take such guerdon as it pleased Providence to ...
— The People Of The Mist • H. Rider Haggard

... be futility. When I read biography, and I have read a good deal of it, I reflect upon the achievements of men, their loves and hates, their steady ambitions hacking away at obstacles until victory is in sight and the guerdon won, or their glorious deaths in action and the fullness of their posthumous fame, and I—I doubt. There is a tinge of theatricality about it all. I doubt. It is not so much that I regret my own failure to copy their example, but rather that the stories don't tally with my own ...
— Aliens • William McFee

... his services, the Boyar conferred a rich guerdon on the peasant, giving him his daughter to wife, and presenting him with ...
— Russian Fairy Tales - A Choice Collection of Muscovite Folk-lore • W. R. S. Ralston

... word of the history of the beautiful Black Virgin of Le Puy and the ordering of the ceremonies of the great pardon, he had conceived the notion he might serve as guide to the pilgrims, deeming he would surely light on someone compassionate enough to pay him a supper in guerdon of his fine stories. But the first folk he had offered his services to had bidden him begone because his ragged coat bespoke neither good guidance nor clerkly wit; so he had come back, downhearted and crestfallen, to the Bishop's wall, where he had his bit of sunshine and his kind ...
— The Merrie Tales Of Jacques Tournebroche - 1909 • Anatole France

... the knight or the squire so bold As to dive to the howling Charybdis below?— I cast in the whirlpool a goblet of gold, And o'er it already the dark waters flow; Whoever to me may the goblet bring, Shall have for his guerdon that gift of ...
— The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886 • Ministry of Education

... courage and, let us add, his appetite, did more than his duty. Thus he obtained as a reward the promise of a bride, his master's daughter. But when the day of danger was past, and the slave applied for the fair guerdon, the Shaykh traitorously refused to keep his word. The Brave, finding a fit opportunity, naturally enough carried off the girl to the mountains; solemnly thrashed every pursuing party; and, having established a "reign of terror," came to the ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 2 • Richard Burton

... chance has fled! Olympian years to come shall knot not The athlete's guerdon for thy head But crown the wigs of Serbs ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, January 28, 1914 • Various

... Pioneer, for thee The day of deeper vision has begun; There is no darkness for the central sun Nor any death for immortality. At last the song of all fair songs that be, At last the guerdon of a race well run, The upswelling joy to know the victory won, The river's rapture when it finds the sea. Ah, thou art wrought in an heroic mould, The Modern Man upon whose brow yet stays A gleam of glory from the age of ...
— Walt Whitman Yesterday and Today • Henry Eduard Legler

... the Knight urge her acceptance of the proposed guerdon, but on this point Mysie was resolute; feeling, perhaps, that to accept of any thing bearing the appearance of reward, would be to place the service she had rendered him on a mercenary footing. In short, she would only ...
— The Monastery • Sir Walter Scott

... laughs at her last shot as she moves away with my media in her hand and some unusually rich guerdon from him. ...
— Under the Southern Cross • Elizabeth Robins

... that it is entirely improbable that the author of the greater of the Shakespearean plays should have allowed their guerdon of fame and immortality to pass to and remain with another. But if we accept the results of the later criticism, we must then agree,—that there were at least three poets who wrought in and for the Shakespearean plays, that ...
— Testimony of the Sonnets as to the Authorship of the Shakespearean Plays and Poems • Jesse Johnson

... go through life in consistent obedience to any high principle,—not even the willing and deliberate martyrs. We must bow to circumstances. Herminia had made up her mind beforehand for the crown of martyrdom, the one possible guerdon this planet can bestow upon really noble and disinterested action. And she never shrank from any necessary pang, incidental to the prophet's and martyr's existence. Yet even so, in a society almost wholly composed of mean and petty souls, incapable of comprehending or appreciating any exalted ...
— The Woman Who Did • Grant Allen

... sons of Laomedon, Priam was the only one who had remonstrated against the refusal of the well-earned guerdon of Heracles; for which the hero recompensed him by placing him on the throne. Many and distinguished were his sons and daughters, as well by his wife Hecuba, daughter of Cisseus, as by other women. Among the sons were Hector, Paris, Deiphobus, Helenus, Troilus, Polites, ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 1 • Various

... does this act befit a Prince like thee, Right worthy is it of thine ancestry. Thy guerdon be a son of peerless worth, Whose wide dominion ...
— Sakoontala or The Lost Ring - An Indian Drama • Kalidasa

... and grudged his gift, Though small; and half in spleen, and half in greed, Sent down two stately coursers all night long To graze the deep sweet pasture round the church: Ill deed: —and so, for guerdon of that sin, Dead lay the coursers twain ...
— The Legends of Saint Patrick • Aubrey de Vere

... summoned there the most felon ten. "Go ye to Carlemaine," spake their liege,— "At Cordres city he sits in siege,— While olive branches in hand ye press, Token of peace and of lowliness. Win him to make fair treaty with me, Silver and gold shall your guerdon be, Land and lordship in ample fee." "Nay," said ...
— The Harvard Classics, Volume 49, Epic and Saga - With Introductions And Notes • Various

... efficiency in the Mile End Road, and yet find himself much at a loss when confronted with the latest products of the West End. The renunciation of the world, except so far as he could aid in mending it, had seemed an easy and cheap price to pay for the guerdon he strove for, to one who had never seen how pleasant this wicked world can look in certain of its aspects. Hitherto, at school, at college, and afterward, he had resolutely turned away from all opportunities of enlarging his experience in this direction. He had shunned society, ...
— Father Stafford • Anthony Hope

... civilization, prodigals have possessed the open sesame to parental hearts that seemed barred against the more dutiful. By what perverted organon of ethics has it come to pass in sociology, that the badge of favoritism is rarely the guerdon of merit? ...
— At the Mercy of Tiberius • August Evans Wilson

... legate answered: "As for that which has been said, that it is better and more advantageous for your state not to interfere in our war, nothing can be more erroneous; because by not interfering you will be left, without favour or consideration, the guerdon of the conqueror." Thus it will always happen that he who is not your friend will demand your neutrality, whilst he who is your friend will entreat you to declare yourself with arms. And irresolute ...
— The Prince • Niccolo Machiavelli

... forge a Sampo, Weld its many-coloured cover, From the tips of swan's white wing-plumes, From the milk of barren heifer, From a single grain of barley, From a single fleece of ewe's wool, Then will I my daughter give you, Give the maiden as your guerdon, And will bring you to your country, There to hear the birds all singing, 320 There to hear your cuckoo calling, On the ...
— Kalevala, Volume I (of 2) - The Land of the Heroes • Anonymous

... but a curse, No, that's wrong—if honestly gained, no harm in a well filled purse, But I often think of the little home standing there by the sea, For far off merry England, the home planned for Aimee and me. Oh to have toiled for her from dawn till the dews of restful night, Her smile my guerdon, her love my prize, her heart so happy and bright. Often I wonder if peace and love have sheltered her with their wings; Of wealth I suppose they have plenty, and the comforts money brings, For Montrose was the heir to a large amount of money I know, And he certainly ...
— Victor Roy, A Masonic Poem • Harriet Annie Wilkins

... consciousness barely permitted the lifting of his heavy eyelids, now Bill, that incarnation of calculating watchfulness, gathered up his magnificent muscles for the act which should bring the first instalment of his reward, the guerdon of his season of super-canine self-mastery. In another second or so Jan would sink down again to sleep. Bill did not snarl or growl. He needed no trumpet-call. He made no more sound than a cat makes in leaping for a bird. Yet he rushed upon the blinking, ...
— Jan - A Dog and a Romance • A. J. Dawson

... That figure me, those, glittering in mine eye, Are chief of all the greatest. This, that shines Midmost for pupil, was the same, who sang The Holy Spirit's song, and bare about The ark from town to town; now doth he know The merit of his soul-impassion'd strains By their well-fitted guerdon. Of the five, That make the circle of the vision, he Who to the beak is nearest, comforted The widow for her son: now doth he know How dear he costeth not to follow Christ, Both from experience of this pleasant life, And of its opposite. ...
— The Divine Comedy, Complete - The Vision of Paradise, Purgatory and Hell • Dante Alighieri

... to us soon! Thou needst not to rise until mid-afternoon; Thou mayst be Croatian, Armenian, or Greek; Thy guerdon shall be ...
— Something Else Again • Franklin P. Adams

... men as a son unto me Will love in my heart, and hold thou henceforward Our kinship new-made now; nor to thee shall be lacking As to longings of world-goods whereof I have wielding; 950 Full oft I for lesser things guerdon have given, The worship of hoards, to a warrior was weaker, A worser in strife. Now thyself for thyself By deeds hast thou fram'd it that liveth thy fair fame For ever and ever. So may the All-wielder With good pay thee ever, as erst he hath done it. Then Beowulf spake ...
— The Tale of Beowulf - Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats • Anonymous

... "But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with the abhorred ...
— Jan of the Windmill • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... all grew grave. Within his breast Sir Gawayne felt a tremor of unrest, But told his story with a gay outside, And asked for some good man to be his guide To find his foe. "I promise him," said he, "No golden guerdon;—his reward shall be The consciousness that unto him 't was given To show a parting soul the way ...
— Gawayne And The Green Knight - A Fairy Tale • Charlton Miner Lewis

... outward seeming, but within oppressed With torments, knowing neither hope nor rest But as she lay the Phoenix flew along Going to Egypt, and knew all her wrong, And pitied her, beholding her sweet face, And flew to Love and told him of her case; And Love, in guerdon of the tale he told, Changed all the feathers of his neck to gold, And he flew on to Egypt glad at heart. But Love himself gat swiftly for his part To rocky Taenarus, and found her there Laid half a furlong from ...
— The Earthly Paradise - A Poem • William Morris

... is the rarest, but most glorious success that life holds forth to the young and the brave. Fame is but a breath; Honor but the paint and tinsel of the stage; Wealth an intolerable burden; but the fire of noble rivalry struck from the souls of the young in the glow of enthusiasm—here is the only guerdon that the world can give to noble endeavor, and the kingly promises of success. And my brave curate, notwithstanding the reverses of the morning, rose to the occasion, kindled by the sincere applause that rang around him for noble efforts that had passed into completeness ...
— My New Curate • P.A. Sheehan

... Grael) that illumines thy pathway, Follow it, follow that far Ideal!— Thine not the guerdon to gain it or grasp it; Soul of thee, passing, ascendeth unto it, Augmenting its brightness for them ...
— Dreams and Dust • Don Marquis

... But the tale of Tortulf and Ingelger is a mere creation of some twelfth century jongleur. The earliest Count whom history recognizes is Fulk the Red. Fulk attached himself to the Dukes of France who were now drawing nearer to the throne, and between 909 and 929 he received from them in guerdon the county of Anjou. The story of his son is a story of peace, breaking like a quiet idyll the war-storms of his house. Alone of his race Fulk the Good waged no wars: his delight was to sit in the choir ...
— History of the English People, Volume I (of 8) - Early England, 449-1071; Foreign Kings, 1071-1204; The Charter, 1204-1216 • John Richard Green

... guest! and yet, hang-dog that I am, I have suffered him to sit by himself like a castaway in yonder obscure nook, without so much as asking him to take bite or sup along with us. It were but the right guerdon of my incivility were he to set off to the Hare and Tabor before the night ...
— Kenilworth • Sir Walter Scott

... sin I expiate in this agony, Hung here in fetters, 'neath the blanching sky. Ah, ah me! what a sound, What a fragrance sweeps up from a pinion unseen Of a god, or a mortal, or nature between, Sweeping up to this rock where the earth has her bound, To have sight of my pangs, or some guerdon obtain— Lo, a god in the anguish, a god in the chain! The god Zeus hateth sore, And his gods hate again, As many as tread on his glorified floor, Because I loved mortals too much evermore. Alas me! what a murmur and motion I hear, As of birds ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1 • Charles Dudley Warner

... heaven will go, Where I may meet with her, (yet this I count but accidental bliss,) And that the full, celestial weal Of all shall sensitively feel The partnership and work of each, And thus my love and labour reach Her region, there the more to bless Her last, consummate happiness, Is guerdon up to the degree Of that alone true loyalty Which, sacrificing, is not nice About the terms of sacrifice, But offers all, with smiles that say, 'Tis little, but it is ...
— The Victories of Love - and Other Poems • Coventry Patmore

... of life. "Well do you all know how our Lord the Infant sets great store by us, that we should make him know clearly about the land of the Negroes, and especially the River of Nile. It will not be a small guerdon that he will give ...
— Prince Henry the Navigator, the Hero of Portugal and of Modern Discovery, 1394-1460 A.D. • C. Raymond Beazley

... of all her yeares: All three do rest within this marble stone, By which the fickleness of worldly joyes appears. Good Frend sticke not to strew with crimson flowers This marble stone, wherein her cindres rest, For sure her ghost lives with the heavenly powers, And guerdon ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 210, November 5, 1853 • Various

... yellow man asks nothing save to be with his master like a dog and to satisfy at once his stomach and his apish curiosity. You, Allan, shall see those dead over whom you brood at night, though the other guerdon that you might have won is now passed from your reach because you ...
— She and Allan • H. Rider Haggard

... rewardeth, were apparent death, Before mine eyes, bolde, hartie, visible, Ide wrastle with him for a deadly fall, Or I would loose my guerdon promised. Ide hang my brother for to wear his coate, That all that saw me might have cause to say, There is a hart more firme then Adamant, ...
— A Collection Of Old English Plays, Vol. IV. • Editor: A.H. Bullen

... years enwrought With love which softens yet: Now God be thanked for every thought Which is so tender it has caught Earth's guerdon of regret. ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... them off to Canada; for a free state is bound to give up a slave when claimed. Instead of sending them away, they would wait until the reward was offered by the masters for the apprehension of the slaves, and then return them, receiving their infamous guerdon. The slaves, aware of this practice, now ...
— Diary in America, Series One • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... expanding, resentment to Mrs. Maynard, who had once held the reins with aristocratic hands. Mrs. Kingsley, the third member of the great triangle, claimed an ancestor on the Mayflower, which was in her estimation a guerdon of blue blood. Her elaborate and exclusive entertainments could never be rivalled by those of Mrs. Wrapp. She was a widow with one child, the daughter Elinor, a ...
— The Day of the Beast • Zane Grey

... Douglas, am I permitted to ask wherefore this mean disguise? Is it for some vow of chivalry, or for that which is the guerdon of chivalry?' the Marquis added in a lower, softer tone, which, however, extremely chafed the proud young Scot, all the more that he felt ...
— Two Penniless Princesses • Charlotte M. Yonge

... I have so much to say." And she came nearer to him for a little space; and her head drooped downward, like a flower full of rain. And she did knit and unknit her white fingers as they hung before her. And she saith, "There is no guerdon worthy such a knight, ...
— A Brother To Dragons and Other Old-time Tales • Amelie Rives

... be ruled, Lycaon's son? For durst thou but at Menelaus shoot Thy winged arrow, great would be thy fame, And great thy favour with the men of Troy, And most of all with Paris; at his hand Thou shalt receive rich guerdon, when he hears That warlike Menelaus, by thy shaft Subdued, is laid upon the fun'ral pyre. Bend then thy bow at Atreus' glorious son, Vowing to Phoebus, Lycia's guardian God, The Archer-King, to pay of firstling lambs An ample hecatomb, when home return'd In safety ...
— The Iliad • Homer

... this great thraldom works disdain Of lesser serving. Once release These bonds he bears, and he may please To give you guerdon sweet as rain To sailors calmed ...
— Gloucester Moors and Other Poems • William Vaughn Moody

... blessed martyr, To bid thee welcome through the gates of pearl; And next to his shall thine own guerdon be If thou devote him willing to thy ...
— The Saint's Tragedy • Charles Kingsley

... the door of Fame, Sudden a Touch upon my shoulder came, And thro' the Dusk an Angel Shape held out The greater Guerdon; and ...
— The Golfer's Rubaiyat • H. W. Boynton

... store of gems, as we have heard said, that a hundred wains might not bear the lead; still more was there of ruddy gold from the Nibelung land. All this the hand of the daring Siegfried should divide. As a guerdon they gave him the sword of Nibelung, but they were served full ill by the service which the good knight Siegfried should render them. Nor could he end it for them; angry of mood (6) they grew. Twelve bold men of their ...
— The Nibelungenlied • Unknown

... throng, No sweet applause rewards his song, No friendly lip that guerdon breathes, To bard more sweet than golden wreaths. It might have been the minstrel's art Had lost the power to move the heart, It might have been his harp had grown Too old to yield ...
— Poems • Denis Florence MacCarthy

... hidden hands What recompense is waiting me Beyond these naked wintry sands? For lo! The ancient legend saith: 'Take ye a rose at Christmas tide, And pin thereto your loving faith, And cast it to the waters wide; Whate'er the wished-for guerdon be, God's hand will guide ...
— The Poets and Poetry of Cecil County, Maryland • Various

... "You owe me no apologies, and need feel no regret. You won it honestly—and I accept it now as a gift; a guerdon of your prowess and ...
— Beatrix of Clare • John Reed Scott

... his own fate: 'What shall be the end of our war, you ask? If this be a general question, I shall answer Victory! If you ask it of myself in particular, I answer, Death, or to be hewn in pieces. This is our faith, this is our guerdon, this is our reward! We ask for no more than this. But when you see me dead, be not then troubled. All those who have prophesied have suffered and been slain. To make my word prevail, there is needed the ...
— Renaissance in Italy, Volume 1 (of 7) • John Addington Symonds

... Charles," he cried, "stand no more parleying, but out and over with the boon ye crave as guerdon for your lucky plum. Ud's fish, lad, out with it; we'd get it for ye though it did rain ...
— The Children's Book of Christmas Stories • Various

... of the Huns Pays liberal homage to those "dauntless" sons Of hostile nations, who have all along Maintained their fellow-countrymen were wrong. No guerdon for their courage is too great, But, till the War is ended, they must wait; Then shall Germania, with grateful soul, Inscribe their names upon her golden roll; And "monumental brasses" shall attest The zeal wherewith they strove to foul ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Dec. 12, 1917 • Various

... had a pivot on which to hang her quadrennial plea, and that pivot was Wyoming, the men of that equal-minded State in both conventions holding up her hands. Miss Anthony's pathetic eyes reveal that she has attained to loneliness—the guerdon of great spirits who struggle from any direction toward the mountain tops of human liberty. But on the heights such souls meet God, and one day all ...
— The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 2 of 2) • Ida Husted Harper

... not Recall Sardanapalus' golden reign. I thought to have made my realm a paradise, And every moon an epoch of new pleasures. I took the rabble's shouts for love—the breath Of friends for truth—the lips of woman for 520 My only guerdon—so they are, my Myrrha: [He kisses her. Kiss me. Now let them take my realm and life! They shall ...
— The Works of Lord Byron - Poetry, Volume V. • Lord Byron

... significance of love; but by a refined process of the same scientific reasoning he reached the conclusion that the human organism achieved its highest purpose in love, that love must not be questioned, but must be accepted as the highest guerdon of life. Thus, he considered the lover blessed over all creatures, and it was a delight to him to think of "God's own mad lover," rising above the things of earth, above wealth and judgment, public opinion and applause, rising above ...
— Martin Eden • Jack London

... was not printed, but written in round hand, with a liberal supply of capitals, on a stiff sheet of official paper, stamped with the Royal Arms at the top. And those who were in the secret knew that Master Bob Stubbard, the Captain's eldest son, had accomplished this great literary feat at a guerdon of one shilling from the public service funds every time he sucked his pen at the ...
— Springhaven - A Tale of the Great War • R. D. Blackmore

... the Earl rose and presented him with a charter for the lands, signed by Eglinton and himself, and he shook him heartily by the hand, saying, that few in all the kingdom had better earned the guerdon of their service than ...
— Ringan Gilhaize - or The Covenanters • John Galt

... remains: I made Ernest happy. I came into his stormy life, not as a new perturbing force, but as one that made toward peace and repose. I gave him rest. It was the guerdon of my love for him. It was the one infallible token that I had not failed. To bring forgetfulness, or the light of gladness, into those poor tired eyes of his—what greater joy could have blessed ...
— The Iron Heel • Jack London

... Heart's Delight Where you and I go faring— Heritage dear of love and toil, Guerdon of faith and daring. For all may win to the ancient gate, Though some are early and some are late, And each hath borne with his hidden Fate,— For never a man but hath his right To enter his Castle ...
— Masters of the Guild • L. Lamprey

... against Isis, whose minister be it remembered she declares herself, herself she sinned yet more. For she would have taken thee both from a heavenly mistress and from an earthly bride, and yet snatch that guerdon of immortality which is hers to-day. Therefore if I am evil, she is worse, nor does the flame that burns within the casket whereof Oros spoke shine ...
— Ayesha - The Further History of She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed • H. Rider Haggard

... footfall, Till they gain at last— Safe in Science, bright with glory— Just the way Thou hast: Then, O tender Love and wisdom, Crown the lives thus blest With the guerdon of Thy bosom, Whereon ...
— Poems • Mary Baker Eddy

... Surtaine's arms she was playing for another stake. So intent had she been upon her purpose that the guerdon of the modern Venus Victrix, the declaration of the lover, was held in the background of her mind. For a swift, bewildering moment, she felt his lips upon hers, the gentlest, the tenderest pressure, instantly relaxed: then the sudden knowledge of him for what he was, a loyal and chivalrous ...
— The Clarion • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... had stolen away his fayre doughter, whiche brought him into such passion and frensie, as he was like to runne out of his wyttes and transgresse the bondes of reason. "Ah, traytour," sayd the good Prince, "is this the guerdon of good turnes, bestowed vpon thee, and of the honour thou hast receiued in my company? Do not thinke to escape scot free thus without the rigorous iustice of a father, deserued by disobedience, and of a Prince, against ...
— The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1 • William Painter

... from the start, Just act your best your little part. Just be as happy as you can, And serve your kind, and die — a man. Just live the good that in you lies, And seek no guerdon of the skies; Just make your Heaven here, to-day — What ho! the World's all ...
— Rhymes of a Rolling Stone • Robert W. Service

... I am afraid there may have been a little affectation in it) a magnificent guerdon of all the silver I had in my. pocket, to requite him for having unintentionally stirred up my patriotic susceptibilities. He was a meek-looking, kindly old man, with a humble freedom and affability of manner that made it pleasant to converse with him. Old soldiers, I know not why, seem ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 11, Issue 67, May, 1863 • Various

... oaths too thickly on each other, for me to value them to the right estimate," said Flammock; "that which is so lightly pledged, is sometimes not thought worth redeeming. Some part of the promised guerdon in hand the whilst, were worth ...
— The Betrothed • Sir Walter Scott

... offering, here consign, Worthy, because it once was thine! Then, maiden, from a warrior deign To take this golden heart and chain! Thy order's emblem! and afar Its light shall lead me, like a star! If thou, its mistress, didst requite With guerdon meet each chosen knight; If from that gifted hand there came A badge of such excelling fame, The broider'd scarf might wave in vain, Unenvied might a rival gain, Amid assembled peers, the crown Of tournay triumph and renown; For me its charm would all ...
— The Lay of Marie • Matilda Betham

... and began to dress hurriedly. Therein he was well advised. Nothing could better become his athletic figure. He was that type of man who looks thinner when fully clothed. He had never spared himself when asking others to work hard, and he received his guerdon now in a frame of iron ...
— The Silent Barrier • Louis Tracy

... ingratitude, which, however, has willed to gain the victory of bearing me to the grave a pauper; the while I kept on thinking that the glory which, despite of those that like it not, this age will inherit from my writings, would not have left me wholly without guerdon. I have had myself carried to this monastery of S. Onofrio; not only because the air is commended by physicians above that of any other part of Rome, but also as it were upon this elevated spot and by the conversation of these devout fathers to commence my conversation ...
— Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2 - The Catholic Reaction • John Addington Symonds

... with all that savored of servitude. The sentiment of liberty is innate in every human breast. Freedom of speech and of action—the right of every man to be his own master—has ever been the inestimable privilege sought, the boon most craved. For this guerdon men have fought; for this they have ...
— Masterpieces of Negro Eloquence - The Best Speeches Delivered by the Negro from the days of - Slavery to the Present Time • Various

... 'Boney' was a terror. The city scavengers have reduced his work to a minimum, and his pay has dwindled proportionately. The twopences which used to be thrown to a sweeper will now pay for a ride, and the smallest coin is considered a sufficient guerdon for a service so light. But what he has lost in substantial emolument, he has gained in morale; he is infinitely more polite and attentive than he was; he sweeps ten times as clean for a half-penny as he did for twopence or sixpence, and thanks you more heartily than was ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 437 - Volume 17, New Series, May 15, 1852 • Various

... interests of humanity, of public virtue, and domestic piety; his cause has ever been the cause of pure religion and of liberty, of national independence and of national illumination. When future critics shall weigh out his guerdon of praise and censure, it will be Southey the poet only, that will supply them with the scanty materials for the latter. They will likewise not fail to record, that as no man was ever a more constant friend, never had poet more friends and honourers among the good of all parties; and that quacks ...
— Biographia Literaria • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... long will Dido mourne a strangers flight, That hath dishonord her and Carthage both? How long shall I with griefe consume my daies, And reape no guerdon ...
— The Tragedy of Dido Queene of Carthage • Christopher Marlowe

... justify the establishment of a brougham, in which he paid his ordinary visits round Barchester; but this was a special occasion, requiring special speed, and about to produce no doubt a special guerdon, and therefore a pair of post-horses were ...
— Doctor Thorne • Anthony Trollope

... had estimated, was the smallest guerdon that so grand an automobilist could offer for the service he had ...
— Strictly Business • O. Henry

... blue eyes and flaxen hair—if I but possessed the guerdon of a noble lady's love—I might not have disappointed you, Kay. I might still have been a true knight and died sword in hand. Unfortunately, however, I possess sufficient Latin blood to make me a little bit lazy—to counsel quitting while the ...
— The Pride of Palomar • Peter B. Kyne

... the spur that the clear spirit doth raise, (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights, and live laborious days; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with the abhorred shears, And slits the thin-spun life. 'But not the praise,' Phoebus replied, and touched my trembling ears; 'Fame is no plant that grows on mortal soil, ...
— Life of John Milton • Richard Garnett

... each demanding two rupees. Useless to protest that we had desired but one of them to perform: they pursued us into the open, and even clung to our knees, and of course we paid—afterwards to learn that one rupee for the lot was a lavish guerdon. ...
— Roving East and Roving West • E.V. Lucas

... he gathered In a bath of mystic brewing; Told each purple, pieded pearl-drop What the evil was he plotted. Never once his purpose wavered, Never once his fury lessened; Nursing vengeance as a guerdon While the mussel-pearls ...
— The White Doe - The Fate of Virginia Dare • Sallie Southall Cotten

... heard, O auspicious King, that the robber then made marks with white chalk upon the door to the end that he might readily find it at some future time, and removing the bandage from the tailor's eyes said, "O Baba Mustafa, I thank thee for this favour: and Almighty Allah guerdon thee for thy goodness. Tell me now, I pray thee, who dwelleth in yonder house?" Quoth he, "In very sooth I wot not, for I have little knowledge concerning this quarter of the city;" and the bandit, understanding that he could find no further clue from the tailor, dismissed ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... Stig, thou self-made King, May’st quickly meet the guerdon due; If God doth spare the youthful heir, Full bitter fruit he’ll make ...
— Marsk Stig - a ballad - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... sunny land, expectant crowds of beauty with hungry eyes making a delirious welcome at every stage, the whole country blooming into dance and banquet and fresh girls at every step taken—these form the fair guerdon that stirs my breast at certain moments and makes me often resolve, after dinner, "to scorn delights and live laborious days," and sell my beautiful soul, illuminated with art and poetry, to the devil of Industry, with reversion to ...
— Twenty-One Days in India; and, the Teapot Series • George Robert Aberigh-Mackay



Words linked to "Guerdon" :   reward



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